what is digital court reporting?

Digital Court Reporting | What You Should Know about Court Reporting

You don’t have to be a lawyer to make significant contributions in court. A career like digital court reporting could be an option for you if you want a job that makes an impact as much as lawyers and prosecutors do. You will be one of the catalysts to a fair trial by delivering accurate transcriptions and recordings of each proceeding. If you want to become a court reporter, here are the court reporting career most asked questions:

What Does a Court Reporter Do?

A court reporter is also considered to be a shorthand reporter or stenographer. They transcribe all the verbal exchanges happening inside the court, including hearings, trials, depositions, and arbitrations. Digital court reporting uses tools like a steno machine that makes 225 words per minute possible, and a video and audio system.

Why is Their Role Significant?

Court reporters play a crucial role in the legal process. They provide matter for lawyers and judges to review through accurately documenting verbatim transcripts in court proceedings. They also impact society by allowing the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities to have access to news and other shows on TV by administering real-time captions, or even in live public events

How Much Do Court Reporters Earn?

This depends on the type of job you will take as a court reporter. The average annual salary is around $54,665 but it could range from $39,442 – $71,549. For freelance court reporters, there is no limit to how much they earn. And if you continue to improve your skills and acquire knowledge, you will soon earn six figures.

Want to Learn Digital Court Reporting?

Learn digital court reporting from experienced lecturers. At Allegiant Digital Reporting Program, we are dedicated to providing a curriculum that will teach professionals proper techniques to become the best in the court reporting field. Call us today for any inquiry or enroll online!

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